DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH


Associate Professor and Chair J.A. Leggatt
Associate Professor and Graduate Co-ordinator
D. Ivison
Professors J.H. Gellert,
  F.M. Holmes,
  J.M. Richardson
Associate Professors A.G. den Otter,
  D. Ivison,
  J.A. Leggatt,
  G.H. Siddall,
  R. Warburton
Assistant Professors A. Guttman,
  C.A. Parkes,
  S. Pound,
  B.B. Stolar
Adjunct Professor K. Fedderson
Professors Emeriti of English D.F. Crozier,
  J.T. Forbes,
  J.F. Futhey,
  W.G. Heath,
  C.G. Liman, 
  S.R. MacGillivray,
  G.D. McLeod,
  D.B. Parsons

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH

Candidates are accepted under the regulations governing the Master's degrees (see page 267-269) provided they also satisfy the requirements of the department.
(a) As prerequisites and/or co-requisites for graduate work, candidates must have taken/be taking English 4903 or 4904, or their equivalents. Should the candidates be lacking in these areas, they must take the necessary course or courses in addition to the other courses in order to qualify for the Master of Arts degree.
(b) Candidates should communicate with the Graduate Coordinator of the Department of English concerning offerings for the ensuing year.
(c) Thesis and research-project program candidates should also discuss possible thesis or research-project topics with the Graduate Coordinator of the department in order that a thesis or research-project supervisor may be assigned.
(d) Applications for entrance into the Master of Arts program should be submitted by February 1. Late applications may be considered for admission, but may not be eligible for funding.

 

PROGRAMS

(a) The English Department offers 4 programs of study at the graduate level: the thesis program, the research-project program, the course-work program, and the collaborative Women's Studies program, all of which involve four FCEs.
(b) Language requirement:
All candidates for the MA degree in English must demonstrate a reading knowledge of French. The Department may allow a student to substitute another language, subject to the availability of adjudicators. Such reading knowledge will be determined by the Department of English in consultation, if necessary, with the concerned members of the Department of Languages.
(c) The Thesis Program:
To fulfill the thesis option, the student must successfully complete English 5790, three additional half courses (or the equivalent) in English at the graduate level, and a thesis (two FCEs) for a total of 4 FCEs.
Full-time thesis students should observe the following schedule:
1. secure a supervisor by February 1 and submit a thesis proposal, as approved by the supervisor, to the Graduate Committee for its approval no later than by May 1 of the first year in the program;
2. submit the revised version of the thesis proposal, if necessary, as approved by the supervisor, to the Graduate Committee for its approval no later than September 1 of the second year in the program;
3. submit a thesis progress form to the Graduate Committee no later than December 1 of the second year in the program;
4. submit the completed thesis for examination by the internal examiner no later than February 15 of the second year in the program;
5. submit the completed thesis for examination by the external examiner no later than March 1 of the second year in the program.
Part-time students are expected to follow the same process but over a slightly longer time (see Period of Study, page 308).
(d) The Research-Project Program:
To fulfill the research-project option, the student must successfully complete English 5790, five additional half-courses (or the equivalent) in English at the graduate level, and a research project (1 FCE) for a total of 4 FCEs. Full-time research-project students should secure a supervisor and submit a research-project proposal to the Graduate Committee for its approval no later than two months prior to the beginning of the term in which the research project will be completed. Students who fail to complete the research project in one term will be required to drop the research project and change to the course-route program and complete two half-courses (or the equivalent) in English at the graduate level in the following term.
Part-time students are expected to proceed at a slower pace but within the time limits (Period of Study) specified on page 308.
(e) The Course-work Program:
To fulfill the course-work option, the student must successfully complete English 5790 and seven additional half-courses (or the equivalent) in English at the graduate level for a total of 4 FCEs.
Full-time students who select the course-work stream must have registered by the beginning of the Fall term of their second year for the courses that remain to be taken to complete the requirements for the degree.
Part-time students are expected to proceed at a slower pace but within the time limits (Period of Study) specified on page 308.
(e) COLLABORATIVE GRADUATE PROGRAM WITH SPECIALIZATION IN WOMEN'S STUDIES
To fulfill the Women's Studies option, the student must successfully complete Women's Studies 5101 and English 5790, as well as satisfy the following requirements:
Thesis students will take an elective half-course in English at the graduate level and write a thesis (2 FCEs) upon a subject related to both English and Women's Studies, for a total of 4 FCEs.
Research-Project students will take three elective half-courses (or the equivalent) in English at the graduate level and write a research project (1 FCE) upon a subject related to both English and Women's Studies, for a total of 4 FCEs.
Course-work students will take five elective half-courses (or the equivalent) in English at the graduate level for a total of 4 FCEs. Two of the major papers written for these graduate course(s) must be focused on a subject related to Women's Studies. One page proposals must be approved by an English-based Women Studies subcommittee no later than six weeks into the term(s).
See the Specialization in Women's Studies, page 272.

Note:
It is possible for a student to change from one MA program to the other provided that he/she secures the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee.

GRADUATE COURSES

Courses not offered this academic year (fall/winter terms) are indicated by the words "NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR" below the course description. Nevertheless, students should refer to the Timetable as a final check.

The following courses are offered for Master's programs.

(Information about Course Numbering System)

English 5050 (ST)
Special Topics in Literary Theory
3-0; or 3-0
Studies in literary theory. Specific authors and topics may vary from year to year.

English 5117 (ST)
Special Topics in Renaissance Literature
3-0; or 3-0
Studies in Renaissance Literature. Specific authors and topics may vary from year to year.

English 5211 (ST)
Special Topics in 17th Century Literature
3-0; or 3-0
Studies in the literature of selected seventeenth-century authors. Specific authors and topics may vary from year to year.

English 5216 (ST)
Special Topics in British Romantic Literature
3-0; or 3-0
Studies in British Romantic literature in the context of historical and cultural developments. Specific authors and topics may vary from year to year.

English 5231 (ST)
Special Topics in 18th Century Literature
3-0; or 3-0
Studies in literature of the eighteenth century in the context of historical and cultural developments. Specific authors and topics may vary from year to year.

English 5331 (ST)
Special Topics in 20th Century British Literature
3-0; or 3-0
Studies in twentieth-century British literature in the context of important social and intellectual developments. Specific authors and topics may vary from year to year.

English 5411 (ST)
Special Topics I
3-0; 0-0
Specific authors and topics in this seminar may vary from year to year.

English 5413 (ST)
Seminar II
0-0; 3-0
Specific authors and topics in this seminar may vary from year to year.

English 5430 (ST)
Special Topics in Victorian Literature
3-0; or 3-0
Studies in Victorian literature in the context of social, historical, and cultural developments. Specific authors and topics may vary from year to year.

English 5510 (ST)
Special Topics in Postcolonial Literature
3-0; or 3-0
Studies in Postcolonial literature and theory. Specific authors and topics may vary from year to year.

English 5611 (ST)
Special Topics in American Literature
3-0; or 3-0
Studies in American literature. Specific authors and topics may vary from year to year.

English 5711 (ST)
Special Topics in Canadian Literature
3-0; or 3-0
Studies in Canadian literature in the context of social, historical, and cultural developments. Specific authors and topics may vary from year to year.

English 5750 (ST)
Special Topics in First Nations Literature
3-0; or 3-0
Studies in First Nations Literatures. Specific authors and topics may vary from year to year.

English 5790
Theories of Literature, Language, and Culture
3-0; 0-0
An exploration of the materials, aims, and techniques of scholarship in the field of literary studies, focusing on theoretical issues related to English as a discipline.

English 5801 (9801)
Research Project
The supervised research and writing of a paper approximately 10,000 words in length.

English 5901 (9901)
Master's Thesis
Grade Scheme: Pass/Fail
The supervised research and writing of a thesis approximately 25,000 to 35,000 words in length.

 


See also:
Faculty of Graduate Studies - Information/Regulations
Department of English - Undergraduate

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2007-2008 Calendar version