Department of Physics


Professor and Chair W.M. Sears
   
MSC (PHYSICS)  
Graduate Co-ordinator A. Linhananta
Core: Master's Thesis Supervisory   
  G. Das,
  M.C. Gallagher,
  M.H. Hawton (Emerita),
  W. J. Keeler (Emeritus),
  A. Linhananta,
  V.V. Paranjape (Emeritus),
  W.M. Sears
Non-Core: Limited Membership  
  F. Ting (Mathematical Sciences)

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN PHYSICS

Candidates are accepted under the regulations governing the Master's degree (see page 267-269) provided that the requirements of the Department are also satisfied.

Application deadline is February 1. Late applications may be considered for admission, but may not be eligible for funding.

 

PROGRAMS

The Department offers a Master of Science Degree with a specialization in Condensed Matter Physics.

(a) The Thesis Program:
To obtain the degree, students must complete the equivalent of two full graduate courses and a thesis (equivalent to three full courses). Students must take at least one FCE from the graduate course offerings in Physics. Fourth year courses in Physics, and honours or graduate courses from other science departments may be taken for graduate course credit, with the permission of the Supervisory Committee. All graduate students must participate in departmental seminars.

Students are required to present two departmental seminars. At the first, held within the first year, the student is required to present a 20-30 minute seminar on the proposed thesis topic. At the second seminar, the student will present the results of his/her research before final approval of the thesis is granted.

(b) The Non-Thesis/Project Program:
Students must complete the equivalent of four full graduate courses and a project course. Fourth year courses in Physics, and honours or graduate courses from other science departments may be taken for graduate course credit, with the permission of the Supervisory Committee. All graduate students must participate in departmental seminars.

(c) The MSc Co-operative Option:
Students enrolled in the MSc (Physics) program may take the Co-operative option subject to the approval of the Department. To obtain the MSc (Physics Co-operative Option) degree the student must satisfy all the academic requirements for the MSc (Physics) degree and in addition must complete Physics 5990 and 5992 successfully. The first and last terms of the student's program must be academic, and at least one of the work-terms must occur in a fall or winter session. The student may have the opportunity to work on a thesis during work-term placements.

 

GRADUATE COURSES

Courses not offered this academic year (fall/winter terms) are indicated by the words "NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR" below the course description. Nevertheless, students should refer to the Timetable as a final check.

The following courses are offered for Master's programs.

(Information about Course Numbering System)

Physics 5111
Advanced Quantum Mechanics I
An in-depth study of some of the fundamental concepts of Quantum Mechanics is presented, with an introduction to more advanced techniques, such as symmetry and tensor operators, density matrix, Heisenberg and interactions pictures, field quantization, second quantization and many particle systems.

Physics 5171
Quantum Statistical Mechanics
0-0; 3-0
Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics are developed and then applied to black-body radiation, conduction electrons in metals, lattice vibrations in solids, magnetism, and superconductivity. The kinetic theory of transport processes is developed from the simplest approximation, to the relaxation time approximation, and finally to the near-exact formulation of the Boltzmann equation. Applications include viscosity, thermal conductivity, self diffusion, and electrical conductivity.

Physics 5211
Solid State Physics I
Electron states in crystals. Lattice vibrations. Electron-phonon interactions.

Physics 5217
Modern Optics
Recent applications and developments in Quantum Optics are covered, including quantized theory of radiation with applications to coherent and squeezed states, two-level and three-level atom, atom-field interaction, and non-linear quantum optics. Further applications include optical cavities, light in medium, and theory of lasers.
Additional selected topics, such as negative refractive index, slow light and optical angular momentum will also be introduced.

Physics 5231
Solid State Physics II
Transport properties of solids. Optical properties. Introduction to polaron and superconductivity theories.

Physics 5311 (ST)
Experimental Methods I
This course is designed to develop understanding and use of experimental techniques in Physics research.

Physics 5411 (ST)
Topics in Physics I
The subject matter of this course may change from year to year, and depends on the interests of the students.

Physics 5431 (ST)
Topics in Physics II
The subject matter of this course may change from year to year, and depends on the interests of the students.

Physics 5801 (9801)
Project

Physics 5901 (9901)
Master's Thesis


See also:
Faculty of Graduate Studies - Information/Regulations
Department of Physics - Undergraduate

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2008-2009 Calendar version