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Geology (GEOL) Courses Listing

Geology 1050 Introductory Geology for Forestry Degree Students View Details
Large-scale structure of the Earth; tectonic, rock and geochemical cycles. Minerals, rocks and their influence on soil fertility. Energy interactions at the Earth's surface - hydrological and atmospheric cycles. Soils and their relation to bedrock and climate, with special reference to forested terrains. Exogenic geologic processes with special influence on glacial sediments.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Offering: 0-0; 2-2
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 1110 Planet Earth View Details
The course offers students the opportunity to better understand and appreciate the evolution and internal functions of the Earth through geological time. An overview of minerals and rocks is followed by discussion of internal processes including igneous activity, earthquakes and magnetism. The origin of continents, ocean basins and large scale structures is presented by applying the concepts of plate tectonics.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Cross-List(s): Environmental Studies 1111
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
Notes: Students who have previous credit in Geology 1111 or Environmental Studies 1111 or 1112 may not take Geology 1110 for credit.
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 1111 Planet Earth with Laboratory View Details
The course offers students the opportunity to better understand and appreciate the evolution and internal functions of the Earth through geological time. An overview of minerals and rocks is followed by discussion of internal processes including igneous activity, earthquakes and magnetism. The origin of continents, ocean basins and large scale structures is presented by applying the concepts of plate tectonics. Laboratory exercises will be devoted to the study of rocks and minerals.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Cross-List(s): Environmental Studies 1112
Offering: 3-2; 0-0
Notes: Students who have previous credit in Geology 1110 or Environmental Studies 1111 or 1112 may not take Geology 1111 for credit. An additional fee (see Miscellaneous Fees) is required for this course. Students are required to attend at least one Saturday field trip.
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 1130 Crust of the Earth View Details
Emphasis is placed on the Earth's crust especially on near-surface processes and their products. The principles of stratigraphy, significance of fossils, variety of depositional environments and hydrogeology are some topics that will be presented. Discussion of geology and the environment will include geological resources, energy consumption and changes to the natural environment caused by human activity.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Cross-List(s): Environmental Studies 1131
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
Notes: Students who have previous credit in Geology 1131 or Environmental Studies 1131 or 1132 may not take Geology 1130 for credit.
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 1131 Crust of the Earth with Laboratory View Details
Emphasis is placed on the Earth's crust especially on near-surface processes and their products. The principles of stratigraphy, significance of fossils, variety of depositional environments and hydrogeology are some topics that will be presented. Discussion of geology and the environment will include geological resources, energy consumption and changes to the natural environment caused by human activity. Laboratory exercises will introduce the student to the use of geological maps and cross-sections.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Cross-List(s): Environmental Studies 1132
Offering: 0-0; 3-2
Notes: Students who have previous credit in Geology 1130 or Environmental Studies 1131 or 1132 may not take Geology 1131 for credit.
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 2112 Principles of Geophysics View Details
An introduction to the principles and applications of various geophysical techniques, and the implications for solid-earth geophysics, mineral exploration, archaeology, and environmental studies.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Notes: It is recommended that students have previously completed Mathematics 1160 or 1180 and Physics 1101 or 1113 and 1133 before taking Geology 2112.
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 2210 Mineralogy View Details
An introduction to mineral sciences, which includes crystallography, physical properties and occurrence of minerals, their application in material science-based industries and their significance in rocks, mineral deposits and environmental systems. Different mineralogical techniques such as macroscopic identification techniques, and introductory optical microscopy will be discussed.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Geology 1110 or 1111 or Environmental Studies 1111 or 1112 and Geology 1130 or 1131 or Environmental Studies 1131 or 1132

Offering: 3-0; 0-0
Notes: Not for credit in the HBSc or BSc Four Year Geology programs.
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 2213 Igneous Processes and Products View Details
An overview of the origin and nature of magmas, their intrusive and extrusive phenomena, the products of crystallization, their economic importance and their potential hazards. The products of igneous activity will be studied in hand-specimen.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Geology 2210 or 2217
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
Notes: Not for credit in the HBSc or BSc Four Year Geology programs.
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 2214 Sediments and Sedimentary Rocks View Details
Topics discussed in the course include: erosion and deposition; shape and size distribution of sediment grains; the interaction between a moving fluid and loose sediment; conditions required for the initiation of sediment transport; classification and mode of formation of sedimentary structures; units formed by wind, wave, tide and mass-flow processes; classification and biologic and chemical controls on the deposition of carbonates; the origin of evaporites, chert, coal, petroleum, and phosphate, iron and magnesium deposits; diagenesis of siliciclastics and carbonates. The laboratory exercises will involve hand sample and microscopic examination of sedimentary rocks and study of the relationship between the mineralogy of the detritus and the mineralogy of the source terrain.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Offering: 0-0; 3-2
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 2215 Igneous Processes and Products with Laboratory View Details
An overview of the origin and nature of magmas, their intrusive and extrusive phenomena, the products of crystallization, their economic importance and their potential hazards. Laboratory studies will familiarize the student with the diverse nature of igneous products by hand-specimen and thin section study.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Geology 2217
Offering: 0-0; 3-3
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 2217 Mineralogy with Laboratory View Details
An introduction to mineral sciences, which includes crystallography, physical properties and occurrence of minerals, their application in material-science based industries and their significance in rocks, mineral deposits and environmental systems. Different mineralogical techniques such as macroscopic identification techniques, and introductory optical microscopy will be discussed. Laboratory work will treat the application of these techniques to minerals.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Geology 1110 or 1111 and Geology 1130 or 1131
Offering: 3-3; 0-0
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 2219 Geochemistry View Details
Trace element behaviour in magmatic and aqueous systems, phase diagrams, distribution coefficients, analytical techniques and assessment of data quality, stable isotopes, applications of geochemistry to sedimentary and ore forming processes.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Geology 1111 and 1131 and Chemistry 1130
Cross-List(s): Environmental Studies 2219
Offering: 3-2; or 3-2
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 2310 Understanding Geology Through Maps View Details
This course deals with the interpretation of the three-dimensional configuration of rock bodies from their distribution at the surface as represented on geological map. Topics could include: the distinction of various stratigraphic and secondary contacts between rock bodies, the attitudes of rock bodies at depth, the construction of geological maps from bore hole or seismic profile data, the determination of displacements on faults, the construction of mine plans at certain levels below O.D., the construction of subcrop maps below unconformities, the construction and interpretation of isopachytes, and the determination of ore shoot intersections. A brief overview of the techniques used to determine both relative and absolute ages of geological bodies and of geological events.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Geology 1110 or 1111 and Geology 1130 or 1131, or permission of the instructor and Chair of the Department

Offering: 3-2; or 3-2
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 2318 Field Mapping View Details
Areas of bedrock outcrop will be visited the week following final spring examinations. These field areas will be utilized to teach the principles of basic mapping. Students will begin by constructing base maps using compass and pace techniques. Field identification of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks will be stressed and this information will be plotted on the base map to produce a geologic map. The final project will be a multi-day mapping exercise where the student will learn to utilize GPS (global positioning system) data to plot locations on topographic base maps.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Geology 1111 and 1131 and Geology 2310 and/or Geology 2217 or permission of the Chair of the Department
Notes: Students are required to complete the St. John Ambulance Standard First Aid course or the approved equivalent (at the student's own expense) prior to registering in this class. An additional fee (see Miscellaneous Fees) is required for this course.
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 3015 Introductory Geology for Engineers View Details
An introduction to Earth systems, cycles, and materials followed by discussion of Earth's interior processes, including seismicity and volcanism, leads to description of common crustal structures and their role in regional and global tectonism. Subsequently emphasis will be directed to a study of important surface processes, resulting features, and geologic hazards. Laboratory work includes the identification of common minerals and rocks, a study of common structures in section and plan view, and interpretation of geologic maps.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Offering: 0-0; 3-1.5
Notes: Not for credit in the HBSc or BSc Geology programs.
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 3110 The Earth and Life Through Time View Details
We will examine the evolution of planet Earth and its inhabitants through geologic time. We will begin by discussing the formation of the early Earth, its atmosphere, and hydrosphere, and learn how these influenced the types of one celled organisms which first developed on the planet. The rise of metazoans and multicellular life with hard parts will then be linked to changes in the atmosphere and stabilization of the continents. Subsequent lectures will deal with life forms present during the past 600 million years and with the formation of the earth as we know it today through the movements of lithospheric plates. Fossils from the time periods under discussion will be examined in conjunction with the lectures.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 3130 Glacial Systems View Details
A systems approach to understanding the processes, deposits and nature of past glaciations in earth history. Glacial deposits, from Precambrian to recent, will be examined. Other topics covered: geochronology of Recent deposits; the effects of northern hemisphere glaciation on mid-latitude and equatorial regions; and, use of glacial deposits in mineral exploration. Students will be required to attend a number of day-long field trips to study local glacial deposits.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Geology 2214 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Geography and the Environment

Cross-List(s): Geography 3315
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 3217 Metamorphism View Details
Physical controls of metamorphism, distribution in space and time, heat flow, global heat budget. Tectonic and historical contingencies affecting the distribution of facies series. Plate tectonic and other tectonic controls on the distribution and style of metamorphism. Deformation processes in crystalline materials, diffusion, crystal plasticity, microscopic deformation mechanism in general.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Geology 2217
Offering: 3-3; or 3-3
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 3218 Mineral Deposits I View Details
This course explores the characteristics and genesis of magmatic and magmatic-hydrothermal mineral deposits. Emphasis will be on NI-Cu-PGE, rare metal, diamond, porphyry and epithermal deposits. Laboratory work will consist of the study of ore suites and other materials from representative deposits.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Geology 2215
Offering: 3-2; or 3-2

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Geology 3310 Structural Geology and Tectonics View Details
Response of rocks to stress, phenomenological models, strain estimates, strain histories and their interpretation. Orientation-distributions of grains and the origin of anisotropic petrofabrics. Three-dimensional representation and interpretation of orientation data (sterograms) manually and by computer. Structural mapping techniques in metamorphic and other terranes. Structural procedures adapted for specific tectonic environments.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Geology 1111, 1131, 2310 and 2318 or permission of the instructor
Offering: 3-2; or 3-2
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 3311 Environmental Geology View Details
The relevance of geology to human society is investigated. Throughout the course students will be taught to relate their understanding of geology to interpreting the world around them. Topics that may be discussed include volcanic hazards, earthquakes, flooding, landslides, desertification and glaciation, global warming, groundwater issues, soil erosion, resource geology, fossil fuels, renewable energy sources, waste management, pollution and environmental law.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Geology 1110 or Geology 1111 or Environmental Studies 1111 or 1112 and Geology 1130 or 1131 or Environmental Studies 1131 or 1132
Cross-List(s): Environmental Studies 3312
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 3313 Introduction to Soil Science View Details
See Department of Geography, Geography Courses, Geography 3313, for full course description.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Cross-List(s): Geography 3313/Environmental Studies 3314
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 3410 Depositional Environments View Details
Interpretation of the depositional environment in which sediments accumulated requires comparison of the lithofacies present in the rock record with standard lithofacies models developed from the study of recent environments. Lithofacies models discussed in this course include: alluvial fans (humid and arid); river systems (meandering, braided and anastomosing); aeolian deposits; lakes (playa, temporate and glacial); deltas (river, wave and tide dominated); strandlines (siliciclastic and carbonate); shelves (siliciclastic and carbonate); deep marine (slope, submarine fan and pelagic); glacial; and volcaniclastic. The laboratory exercises provide practical experience in interpreting depositional environments.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Geology 2214
Cross-List(s): Environmental Studies 3410
Offering: 3-2; or 3-2
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 4011 Environmental Geochemistry View Details
An introduction to the principles of stable isotope geochemistry, with specific emphasis on the behaviour of oxygen, hydrogen and carbon isotopes among the bio-,hydro-,litho-, and atmosphere. Students will be introduced to theoretical and practical applications of stable isotopes to environmental studies.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 1130 or Chemistry 1131 and either Geology 2219 or Chemistry 2111
Cross-List(s): Chemistry 4011/Environmental Studies 4011
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 4015 Basic Scientific Methods in Geology View Details
Specific topics concerned with problems and materials encountered by Civil and Environmental Engineers. Topics discussed may include: application of geometrical techniques to the solution of problems in structural geology, quarrying and mining; natural radioactivity, its causes and consequences (radon, groundwater chemistry); applications of mineralogical and geological principles to radioactive waste disposal; origin and nature of some industrial minerals (diamond, graphite, salt, gypsum, asbestos, silica); the mineralogy, composition and stability of natural and synthetic silicate and carbonate constructional materials (granite, sandstone, bricks, Portland cement).
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Geology 3015 or 1110 or 1130 or permission of the Chair of the Department
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
Notes: Not for credit in the MSc, HBSc or BSc Geology programs.
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 4132 Biogeochemistry View Details
Biogeochemistry introduces the student to the fundamentals of biogeochemical cycling. Processes and reactions governing elemental cycles in the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere are discussed. Global change is investigated by focusing on chemical, physical, geological, and biological processes that cycle elements through the Earth's system. Topics such as the origin of life, global element cycles, global change, and the global carbon budget will be covered.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 1110 and 1130; Geology 1110 or 1111 or Environmental Studies 1111 or 1112 and Geology 1130 or 1131 or Environmental Studies 1131 or 1132
Offering: 3-2: or 3-2

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Geology 4137 Groundwater View Details
Both the physical and chemical attributes of groundwater are examined. Porosity and permeability will be examined for various types of substrate consisting of loose sediment and bedrock. Methods of evaluating groundwater flow rates and aquifer volumes will be utilized to quantify subsurface water supplies. Techniques employed in exploring for groundwater reserves will be discussed. Groundwater geochemistry forms the other important aspect of material taught in this course. The chemical variability of natural groundwater (Eh, pH, dissolved ion concentration) will be contrasted with the effects of pollution (esp. sewage, pesticides and hydrocarbons) on aquifer systems. Remediation methods for contaminated aquifers will be explored.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Geology 1110 or 1111 or Environmental Studies 1111 or 1112 and Geology 1130 or 1131 or Environmental Studies 1131 or 1132
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 4161 Field School View Details
Geology majors are required to complete a two- to three-week field program totalling about 150 hours. The normal time for this course is during late August to early September after completion of the third year of Geology courses. Location of the project areas may vary from year to year, but, generally regions adjacent to Lake Superior are visited. The students will be exposed to a variety of field techniques in diverse geological settings and will be required to formalize field observations in geological reports.
Credit Weight: 1.0
Prerequisite(s): Enrolment restricted to geology majors except where special permission of the Chair of the Department is granted.*
Notes: *Students meeting the above requirements may only participate after satisfactory completion of the third year of their program or equivalent preparation. Students are required to complete the St. John Ambulance Standard First Aid course or the approved equivalent (at the student's own expense) prior to registering in this class. An additional fee (see Miscellaneous Fees) is required for this course.
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 4181 Techniques and Research in Geology: Thesis View Details
Detailed practical instruction by members of the Department in special techniques related to the student's limited research project which involves either or both field and laboratory studies. Students will be expected to attain a high level of technical competence during the period of this course. A thesis will be prepared after consultation and discussion with a faculty supervisor and will be examined by means of oral presentation.
Credit Weight: 1.0
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Chair of the Department
Offering: 0-6; 0-6
Notes: For Honours BSc students.
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 4215 Advanced Igneous Petrology View Details
Investigation into the nature and origin of volcanic and plutonic igneous rocks. Discussion of radiogenic isotopes, dating methods, trace element behaviour in different tectonic environments, and stable isotopes as applied to igneous petrogenesis.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Geology 2215 and 2219
Offering: 3-2; or 3-2
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 4313 Geological Case Studies View Details
Case studies are used to teach concepts of geological analysis on a regional scale. Published literature about the mapped lithologies, structure, petrology, geochemistry, geophysics, stratigraphy and/or geochronology of various regions will be used to unravel geological history and evaluate tectonic models. Typical case studies may include, for example, the Appalachian orogenic belt, the North American Cordillera, the Himalayan-Tibetan orogeny, and Proterozoic tectonics of North America.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Chair of the Department
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Geology 4411 Mineral Deposits II View Details
Students will explore the characteristics and genesis of hydrothermal mineral deposits. Emphasis will be on VMS, SEDEX, sediment-hosted copper, carbonate-hosted, orogenic gold and uranium deposits. Laboratory work will consist of the study of ore suites and other materials from representative deposits.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Geology 2215 and 3218

Offering: 3-2; or 3-2
Course Classifications: Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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