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Anthropology (ANTH) Courses Listing

Anthropology 0300 Introduction to Language View Details
See Department of Languages, Linguistics Courses, Linguistics 0300, for full course description.
Credit Weight: 1.0
Cross-List(s): Linguistics 0300
Course Classifications:
  • Type A: Humanities
  • Type B: Social Sciences

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Anthropology 1032 Introduction to Biological Anthropology and Archaeology View Details
A general introduction to biological anthropology and archaeology. The course covers topics ranging from the biological origin of humans, the appearance of human culture, and the rise of civilization.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 1034 World Cultures View Details
Anthropology is the study of the biological and cultural complexity of human beings, both past and present. Socio-cultural anthropologists are interested in how societies and cultures function – how people in different locations adapt to their environment, the countless symbolic systems they use to communicate with each other, the political and religious institutions that give meaning to their lives, the modes families are structured, and the forms they make a living. This course is intended to introduce students to the anthropological study of cultural diversity, involving ways of comparing and contrasting the structures of social relationships and belief systems that function in different cultural settings. A series of examples will be derived from the past and present social organization of Indigenous peoples and western cultures. This involves the development of culture and traditional practices, relationship between people and the land, linguistic variations, impacts of colonialism and peoples' capacity to self-determine their identities and future. Students will learn about the fascinating array of customs and traditions that constitute Indigenous peoples past and modern cultures from Canada and around the world.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type A: Humanities
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type E: Indigenous Content

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Anthropology 2110 Biology of Human Variation View Details
This course focuses on human microevolution. Topics include evolutionary theory, the genetic background of human variation, human adaptability and the role of disease in human evolution.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 1032 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; 0-0
Notes: Students who have previous credit in Anthropology 2106 may not take Anthropology 2110 for credit.
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Type D: Health and Behavioral Sciences

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Anthropology 2112 Human Evolution View Details
The field of paleoanthropology is examined in this course. Students are introduced to comparative primate biology, including behaviour, as a background to examining the fossil evidence for human evolution.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 2110 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 0-0; 3-0
Notes: Students who have previous credit in Anthropology 2106 may not take Anthropology 2112 for credit.
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 2116 Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective View Details
After a brief introduction to the anthropological approach, different cultural interpretations of gender roles and abilities are discussed. Homosexuality will be examined cross-culturally. How some human societies organize sexual differences by assigning work roles and other activities is also reviewed. Societies at various technological levels will be used as examples. This includes forager, horticultural, pastoral, agricultural, and industrial societies, specifically in Scandinavia, Japan, Russia and Canada.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Cross-List(s): Women's Studies 2116
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
Notes: Women's Studies Group 1 Course
Course Classifications:
  • Type A: Humanities
  • Type B: Social Sciences

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Anthropology 2118 Tracing Human Migrations View Details
This course reviews the movement of people around the world using linguistic, archaeological, biological and genetic evidence. It includes the study of communities and peoples from Canada and around the world, including Indigenous communities and their languages, cultural resources, and biological and genetic contexts. It focuses on the relationship of different peoples and includes the impacts of peoples coming into contact with one another, for example ancient empire building and modern colonialism.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1032
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Type E: Indigenous Content

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Anthropology 2137 Fundamentals of Archaeology View Details
An introduction to modern archaeological methods. Topics include: chronometric dating, archaeological survey and excavation techniques, artifact analysis, environmental archaeology (archaeobotany, geoarchaeology and zooarchaeology), ethnoarchaeology, social archaeology, cognitive archaeology, and the archaeology of ethnicity.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 1032 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; 0-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 2151 Ancient Peoples and Places View Details
An overview of Old and New World archaeology, with particular emphasis on the development of humans and culture from hunting/gathering to agricultural and ancient urban societies in Mesoamerica, Europe, Egypt, Mesopotamia, the Indus Valley, and China.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Offering: 0-0, 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type A: Humanities
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 2173 The Archaeology of North America View Details
An examination of the transformation and adaptation of ancient Indigenous cultures of Canada and the USA using archaeological recoveries to aid interpretation.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 1032 and 1034 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Cross-List(s): Indigenous Learning 2173
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Type E: Indigenous Content

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Anthropology 2332 Peoples and Cultures of Africa View Details
Addresses a range of African cultures, and reviews their diversity and complexity. Traditional Africa culture still continues, and knowledge of this heritage is vital to understand contemporary change and recent events.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type A: Humanities
  • Type B: Social Sciences

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Anthropology 2515 Key Concepts in Ethnology View Details
The meaning and purposes underlying the study of different cultures has changed considerably since the origins of the discipline from the end of the nineteenth century until the current days. Economic interests, political agendas, ethics, Indigenous political movements and intellectual commitments have informed distinct views of the focus of study in Socio-cultural Anthropology. This course is intended to present the development of anthropology, its theories and core concepts that have informed anthropological research. The methods employed are aimed at understanding Indigenous societies in the past and present as well as global practices. Cultural anthropologists by their very training are expected to understand culturally appropriate ways of engaging communities especially minorities, oppressed groups and Indigenous peoples. Understanding these concepts enable students to better comprehend the past, present and future societies.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 1034 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; 0-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type E: Indigenous Content

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Anthropology 2517 Exploring Ethnography View Details
Ethnography, as the hallmark method and product of sociocultural anthropology, combines the theories and practices of the discipline. Students will engage in selected ethnographies to explore topics such as culture, fieldwork, and the representations of the Other and the Self.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

A half-course in Anthropology or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 0-0; 3-0
Course Classifications: Type B: Social Sciences

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Anthropology 2550 Traditional Indigenous Cultures View Details
A study of the ethnographic features of the Indigenous peoples of Canada before sustained contact with Europeans, including the manner in which their citizens earned a livelihood, organized their social and economic affairs, and performed their ceremonies.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 1034 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Cross-List(s): Indigenous Learning 2550
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type A: Humanities
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type E: Indigenous Content

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Anthropology 2811 Special Topic I View Details
A half course on a selected topic in anthropology.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Special Topic: Yes
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 2813 Special Topic II View Details
A half course on a selected topic in anthropology.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Special Topic: Yes
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 3010 Geoarchaeology View Details
An introduction to geoarchaeology as a contextual framework for human paleoecology. Major topics include description and interpretation of sediments in which archaeological remains are found, consideration of the natural processes that create the archaeological record, and reconstruction of landscapes on which ancient people lived. Also addressed are: climate change, and the effects of these changes on biota; dating methods in archaeology; and geological sourcing techniques.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 2137 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 2-3; or 2-3
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 3011 Topics in Human Origins View Details
An introduction to more advanced theoretical concepts and methodological techniques for comparative human and nonhuman primate biology and evolution. Particular emphasis is placed on using the comparative method to test hypotheses about human and nonhuman primate evolution. The use of dimensional techniques, such as laser scanning and photogrammetry, in paleoanthropological research is also examined.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 2110 and 2112 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Notes: Students who have previous credit in Anthropology 3817 with the topic "Human Origins" may not take Anthropology 3011 for credit.
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 3015 Ethnographic Field Methods View Details
Students are introduced to how anthropological fieldwork is conducted and will gain practical experience through class assignments. After being introduced to the ethical requirements of doing research with human subjects, students will learn through lectures and practice how to collect, code, analyze and present research data. The varied methods integral to ethnology and ethnography will be mastered through practical assignments. These skills will be applicable to other anthropology classes, including the honours thesis.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 1034 and 2517 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0

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Anthropology 3118 Scientific Applications in Archaeology View Details
The detailed study of archaeological sites and materials with an emphasis on methods for understanding human relationships with the environment. Specific topics include the analysis of site sediments, remote sensing, archaeological reconnaissance, and map production and interpretation.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 2137 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 2-3; or 2-3
Notes: Students who have previous credit in Anthropology 3001 may not take Anthropology 3118 for credit.
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 3133 Environmental Archaeology View Details
A hands-on introduction to the analysis of animal and plant remains in archaeological and paleoecological settings.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Two FCEs in Anthropology at the second year level or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Cross-List(s): Environmental Studies 3133
Offering: 2-3; or 2-3
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 3136 Forensic Anthropology View Details
This course examines the role of biological anthropology within the forensic sciences. It uses a case study approach to illustrate the procedures and responsibilities of bioanthropologists in the legal setting. Topics include the recovery of evidence from the crime scene, methods of skeletal and biochemical analysis (including DNA), and the role of the scientific expert in court.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Cross-List(s): Criminology 3136
Offering: 3-3; or 3-3
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Type D: Health and Behavioral Sciences

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Anthropology 3138 Introduction to DNA Molecular Methods View Details
An introduction to methods used in molecular biology, biochemistry and molecular anthropology with emphasis on the techniques and their application. The laboratory component covers the analysis of nucleic acids particularly DNA, and includes basic techniques such as gel electrophoresis, DNA extraction, and the polymerase chain reaction. Methods of DNA data analysis and interpretation are also introduced, including forensic science, molecular anthropology, molecular biology and molecular archaeology.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Two of: Anthropology 2110, Biology 2171, Biology 2230, Biology 2910, Chemistry 1210; or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Cross-List(s): Biology 3138
Offering: 1-3; or 1-3
Notes: An additional fee (see Miscellaneous Fees) is required for this course.
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Type D: Health and Behavioral Sciences

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Anthropology 3139 Molecular Anthropology View Details
Molecular Anthropology or Human Population Biology is the biological study of peoples from around the world. This course addresses the methods applied to the molecular study of humans in human evolution, human diversity, population movements and forensic identification. This course emphasizes the appropriate ways of engaging communities, families and individuals to establish a research partnership, especially important in Canada with Indigenous communities. It combines the communities’ knowledge of their own history and diversity within the research question of population biology. It also covers aspects of the legal rights of individuals in a forensic investigation.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 3138 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Cross-List(s): Biology 3139
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 3231 Historic Archaeology View Details
A study of archaeological methods as they are applied to societies with a written historic tradition. The discussion focuses on the archaeology of the fur trade in Canada and the northern U.S.A. It considers the theoretical and methodological development of the discipline, and introduces methods of identifying technologies reflecting innovations over the last 500 years.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 2137 or permission of the Chair of the Department

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 3232 Archaeology of Europe View Details
Topics and research problems in European archaeology, from the first Europeans to the formation of states and empires. Topics may include the life-ways of Neanderthals and other early hunter-gatherers, Ice Age art, the origins and spread of farming, early metallurgy, the development of inequality, and the interactions between “civilized” and “barbarian” societies.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 1032 or 2151, or permission of the Chair of the Department

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 3234 Issues in Consulting Archaeology View Details
Most North American archaeological research is currently part of environmental impact assessment and cultural heritage management. Consulting archaeology addresses sites / localities at risk of disturbance from development while working in a competitive business environment. Since such development often triggers constitutional obligations to address Aboriginal and treaty rights, consulting archaeologists are increasingly engaging with Indigenous communities. These new realities raise complex conceptual ethical, operational and social challenges. These are reviewed through case studies associated with doing archaeology within a business framework.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 2137 and 2151 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Type E: Indigenous Content

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Anthropology 3235 Ceramic Analysis View Details
The analysis of ceramics, combining archaeology and ethnology. From prehistory to the present, people have used clay to form pottery and other objects. How can ceramic evidence permit inferences about societies past and present? Topics include the chemistry and mineralogy of clays; physical properties of ceramics; techniques of pottery production; organization of ceramic data; analysis of pottery style, form and function; instrumental analysis; and frameworks for interpreting the societies, politics, and economies of pottery makers and users. Perspectives from archaeology and ethnology are joined with the development of hands-on laboratory skill including drawing pottery, analyzing fabric, working with a ceramics database, and creating typologies.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 1032 or 2151, or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-3; or 3-3
Notes: Students who have previous credit in Anthropology 3815 or 3817, with topic title Ceramics Analysis, may not take Anthropology 3235 for credit.
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 3238 History of Ethnology View Details
A review of the historical development of cultural anthropology, the study of contemporary cultures, and those of the recent past. The course content focuses on the contributions that have been made to the discipline by eminent scholars such as Franz Boas, Bronislaw Malinowski, Edward Evans-Pritchard, Margaret Mead, Alfred Kroeber, and Claude Levi-Strauss.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Anthropology 1034 or permission of the instructor
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Notes: Students who have previous credit in Anthropology 3218 may not take Anthropology 3238 for credit.
Course Classifications: Type B: Social Sciences

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Anthropology 3312 Medical Anthropology View Details
Introduction to the central concepts and methods of medical anthropology, drawing on classic and contemporary texts. How do social processes determine disease and health outcomes among individuals and groups? Social, political, and economic agendas will be analyzed to show how illness is socially constructed, diagnosed, managed, and treated in various societies.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 2515 and 2517 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Notes: Students who have previous credit in Anthropology 3320 may not take Anthropology 3312 for credit.
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Type D: Health and Behavioral Sciences

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Anthropology 3315 Archaeology of the Boreal Forest View Details
A review of the archaeological study of pre-contact Aboriginal cultures of the Canadian boreal forest. Of special interest are the socio-economic adaptations of hunters and gatherers to the ecology of the northern forests. While northern Ontario is of central concern, other archaeological cultures throughout the Canadian subarctic are considered.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 2173 or permission of the Chair of the Department

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Type E: Indigenous Content

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Anthropology 3455 Stable Isotopes in Bioanthropology View Details
Introduction to the bioanthropological application of stable isotopes and other biochemical, geochemical and ecological techniques. Various stable isotopes (including C, N, O, S, H, Sr) can be used in the assessment of paleo-diet, life history and migratory patterns, to infer paleo-ecological contexts, and also in forensic applications.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 2110 and 2112 or permission of the Chiar of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 3534 Visual Anthropology View Details
Today people frequently use film and video to represent their culture, providing people around the globe with intimate portraits of themselves. The course content explores the insights that filmmakers and videographers have provided through their works into the nuances of their cultures.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 1034 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type A: Humanities
  • Type B: Social Sciences

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Anthropology 3551 Aboriginal and Treaty Rights in Canada View Details
Examine the cultural aspects of selected conflicts between the Indigenous peoples of Canada and the federal and provincial governments over Aboriginal and treaty rights, including the roles these rights play in maintaining the integrity of the cultures of the Indigenous peoples of Canada, and the ways in which other-than-Indigenous Canadians see these rights.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 1034 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

 

Cross-List(s): Indigenous Learning 3551
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type A: Humanities
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type E: Indigenous Content

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Anthropology 3671 Geography of the Arctic Region View Details
See Department of Geography and the Environment, Geography Courses, Geography 3671, for full course description.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Cross-List(s): Geography 3671/Northern Studies 3671
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 3711 Anthropology of Relations: Kinship, Families and Gender View Details
Contemporary forms of family organization and, more broadly, categories of relatedness, exhibit a wide range of composition (2-parent, single-parent, blended, same-sex, etc.). Categories such as family, community, parent, and child will be discussed as historically variable, socially produced, and politically charged. Explores and rethinks fundamental questions about families, households, and communities.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 2515 and 2517 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications: Type B: Social Sciences

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Anthropology 3715 Plagues and Peoples View Details
An examination of selected historic, recent and emerging infectious disease epidemics within an evolutionary, ecological and epidemiological context, and considers the complex biological, social and economic repercussions for human populations.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

One full course equivalent in Anthropology or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Type D: Health and Behavioral Sciences

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Anthropology 3717 Exploring Cultural Diversity View Details
In an increasingly interconnected world, all societies confront the challenge of interacting with cultures that espouse different values, perspectives and world views. Students will examine the customs and traditions of diverse cultures to explore how customs function within the context of the host society.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 1034 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type A: Humanities
  • Type B: Social Sciences

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Anthropology 3718 Anthropology of Magic and Religion View Details
Explores the ways in which people around the world employ magic and religion to interact with the supernatural world, from their magical and religious rituals to roles that magic and religion play in cultural life.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 1034 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Cross-List(s): Religious Studies 3718
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type A: Humanities
  • Type B: Social Sciences

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Anthropology 3719 Anthropology of Violence and War View Details
Conflict exists everywhere, even in the smallest societies. In some cases, violence and war are the result. This course combines rich empirical descriptions of violence and war with a comprehensive theoretical discussion of the foundation of these extreme forms of behaviour.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 1034 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications: Type B: Social Sciences

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Anthropology 3739 Anthropology of Art View Details
Cross-cultural and diachronic consideration of art and art-making in human societies. The arts of hunter-gatherers, simple farmers, and complex societies – today and in the past – are examined in comparative perspective. The ethnography and archaeology of visual arts, music, dance, and body art are brought to bear on the question: is art a human universal?
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 1032 and 1034, or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type A: Humanities
  • Type B: Social Sciences

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Anthropology 3801 Archaeological Field School View Details
Training in archaeological field methods through participation in an excavation project. Students will gain practical experience in archaeological reconnaissance and standard excavation methods, site mapping, field data recording, artifact identification, and data analysis. This intensive field course occurs over 6 weeks in the spring or summer term.
Credit Weight: 1.0
Prerequisite(s):

One FCE in Anthropology or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Notes: An additional fee (see Miscellaneous Fees) is required for this course.
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 3811 Special Topic I View Details
A half course on a selected topic in anthropology.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Chair of the Department
Special Topic: Yes
Offering: 3-0; 0-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 3813 Special Topic II View Details
A half course on a selected topic in anthropology.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Chair of the Department
Special Topic: Yes
Offering: 0-0; 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 3815 Special Topic I with Laboratory View Details
A half course on a selected topic in archaeology or biological anthropology.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Chair of the Department
Special Topic: Yes
Offering: 2-2; 0-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 3817 Special Topic II with Laboratory View Details
A half course on a selected topic in archaeology or biological anthropology.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Chair of the Department
Special Topic: Yes
Offering: 0-0; 2-2
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 4010 Current Issues in Anthropology View Details
A curiosity-driven seminar exploring recent methodological and theoretical issues in anthropology.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

One FCE in Anthropology at the third year level or permission of the Chair of the Department

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 4011 Advanced Paleoanthropology View Details
Advanced concepts and knowledge in the field of paleoanthropology are examined in this course. Topics surround the morphological, archaeological, and genetic evidence for human evolution and the implications for understanding human diversity during the past and present.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 2110 and 2112 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Notes: Students who have previous credit in Anthropology 4013 with the topic "Advanced Paleoanthropology" may not take Anthropology 4011 for credit.
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 4111 Ecological and Environmental Anthropology View Details
This course explores theoretical issues relating to the integration of human beings into complex ecosystems. These human/environment relationships are reviewed in terms of the development of theoretical models from the mid 18th century up to the late 20th century.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

One FCE in Anthropology at the third year level or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Cross-List(s): Environmental Studies 4111
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Notes: Students who have previous credit in Anthropology 4001 may not take Anthropology 4111 for credit.
Course Classifications: Type B: Social Sciences

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Anthropology 4114 Human Impacts on the Environment View Details
It has become increasingly apparent that human society is capable of profoundly altering natural ecosystems. Although the scale of human impact on the environment has increased over the last 100 years, the present condition of the earth's ecosystems is the result of a long history of human-environmental interactions. Archaeology and other historical sciences play a central role in understanding the long-term effects of our species on the earth. The course provides an opportunity to explore this topic through a discussion of the recent literature.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 2137 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology. Anthropology 3010 is recommended.

Cross-List(s): Environmental Studies 4114
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 4219 Human Skeletal and Dental Biology View Details
A comprehensive study of human osteology and dental anatomy.  The lab focuses on both normal and variational anatomy.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 2110, and either Anthropology 3136 or 3150, or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-3; or 3-3
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 4417 DNA in Forensic Science View Details
An examination of the role of DNA analysis in the court systems of Canada and the United States. An overview of the recent history of DNA analysis and its role as evidence, and of the debate challenging the credibility of DNA evidence. The scientific basis of DNA analysis (both nuclear and mitochondrial), including variant techniques such as DNA fingerprinting and restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP's) are explained. The continuity of evidence from crime scene to court room, as well as statistical methods, are covered in detail.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

One full course equivalent in Anthropology and one full course equivalent in Biology, or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Type D: Health and Behavioral Sciences

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Anthropology 4419 Ancient DNA View Details
An advanced study of ancient and degraded DNA. The course content covers the history of the field, including a history of methodological development. The course also covers critical aspects in the field of ancient DNA such as DNA damage and problems associated with its study, including authentication and verification of ancient and degraded DNA results, followed by literature and case studies pivotal to the field and its development.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

One full course equivalent in Anthropology and one full course equivalent in Biology, or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 4430 Molecular Paleopathology View Details
An advanced course in the genetic identification of disease in the past. The course covers the methods and techniques employed in the identification of disease, including parasitic, bacterial, viral and hereditary diseases. Case studies will be presented to demonstrate the methods and techniques and their application to archaeology, and evolutionary and medical biology.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 3138/Biology 3138 or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Type D: Health and Behavioral Sciences

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Anthropology 4450 Forensic and Archaeological Microscopy View Details
Microscopic, chemical and biochemical techniques for the characterization of different types of organic trace materials and residues. Interpretation of the forensic and archaeological trace evidence, including fibres, hair, blood residues or stains, plant residues, plant microfossils, pollen and biological debris. A laboratory component is included for the hands on analysis of archaeological and forensic material.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Offering: 2-1; or 2-1
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Type D: Health and Behavioral Sciences

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Anthropology 4501 Advanced Cultural Anthropology View Details
This course is intended for the student majoring in Anthropology at the honours level. The course will deal with selected topics in socio-cultural, medical, or applied anthropology at an advanced level.
Credit Weight: 1.0
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Chair of the Department
Offering: 3-0; 3-0
Course Classifications: Type B: Social Sciences

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Anthropology 4503 Advanced Archaeology View Details
This course is intended for the student majoring in Anthropology at the honours level. The course will deal with selected topics in archaeology at an advanced level.
Credit Weight: 1.0
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Chair of the Department
Offering: 3-0; 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 4505 Advanced Biological Anthropology View Details
This course is intended for the student majoring in Anthropology at the honours level. The course will deal with selected topics in biological or biomedical anthropology at an advanced level.
Credit Weight: 1.0
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Chair of the Department
Offering: 3-0; 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences
  • Type D: Health and Behavioral Sciences

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Anthropology 4517 Society, Culture and Nature View Details
See Department of Sociology, Sociology Courses, Sociology 4517, for full course description.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Cross-List(s): Sociology 4517/Environmental Studies 4517
Course Classifications: Type B: Social Sciences

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Anthropology 4737 Material Culture View Details
Examination of the built worlds that enable and constrain human cultural and social life. From everyday objects like cups, houses, and clothes to extraordinary works such as feasts, aqueducts, and skyscrapers, material worlds have framed our lives in culturally constituted ways. Different cultural configurations of materiality and their relation to human social action are considered.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s):

Anthropology 1032 and 1034, or permission of the Chair of the Department of Anthropology

Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 4811 Special Topic I View Details
A half-course on a selected topic in anthropology.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Chair of the Department
Special Topic: Yes
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 4813 Special Topic II View Details
A half-course on a selected topic in anthropology.
Credit Weight: 0.5
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Chair of the Department
Offering: 3-0; or 3-0
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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Anthropology 4901 Honours Thesis View Details
Recommended for students considering graduate work in sociocultural anthropology, biological anthropology or archaeology. See Notes under HBA and HBSc programs for preparatory work to be done by the end of third year. The thesis may be on any topic approved by the student's advisor and may entail field and/or laboratory work, as well as library research.
Credit Weight: 1.0
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Chair of the Department and a minimum B (70%) overall average in third year level Anthropology courses
Course Classifications:
  • Type B: Social Sciences
  • Type C: Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences

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